#VisitDresden

Dresden Elbland

The highlights

We all know that Dresden is the epitome of baroque, as exemplified by the star attractions of Semper Opera, Zwinger and Frauenkirche. But the city has so much more to offer, especially during the autumn season. 2020 is going to be a bit different from previous years, not least because there will be even more outdoor events.

Start the day fresh and relaxed. Then for a day of contrasts. Make sure that your sightseeing tour includes Dresden Neustadt on the right bank of the river. Evenings are the time for some high-quality entertainment. 

If it’s all too much to take in, just extend your stay by a day or two!

Highlights for a colourful autumn

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Autumn walks

The most important sights in Dresden can be wonderfully explored on foot. Just take a few minutes more time and enjoy the colorful autumn atmosphere in the city on a walk. In the Großer Garten or the Alaunpark you are very close to the Golden October.

In the Elbland, the vines in the Elbland are colored in autumn in a wide variety of colors. Also here a short hike is worthwhile. As a reward, you can get one or two good drops of wine in the broom house or directly from the winegrower.

Tips for the autumn

Whether a walk through colorful forests, mushroom picking or a relaxing wellness day. Here are our autumn tips for you.

State Operetta

Between colorful vines through the romantic vineyards of Radebeul or on the King’s Trail around Moritzburg Castle – 10 hiking suggestions for the autumn

Opera, drama, concerts

Do you enjoy music and theatre? With more than 30 live performance venues, you are spoilt for choice. Foremost amongst them is the Semper Opera House with its magnificent repertoire of traditional and modern productions. Then there is the Dresden State Operetta in the new artistic and creative complex of Kraftwerk Mitte, offering a mix of well-known musicals and the finest operettas; it is the only stage in Germany devoted exclusively to the genre.

Theatre of the non-musical variety can be found at the Staatsschauspiel Dresden. Supplementing the familiar faces on the Dresden drama scene are guest appearances by well-known actors and actresses from other major German companies. The Dresden Philharmonic Orchestra normally performs in the large concert hall of the Kulturpalast, but during the 2020 summer season, they will give four open-air concerts in the context of the Film Nights on the Elbe Embankment festival.

Younger visitors to Dresden will enjoy the fairy tales and other entertaining stories told at the Dresden Puppentheater, while teenagers will appreciate the youth-focused programme of the Junge Generation theatre whose latest production is Das doppelte Lottchen. The Semperoper also organises behind-the-scenes tours for youngsters.

Semper Opera House

Dresden boasts one of the most beautiful opera houses in the world, admired for its magnificent acoustics and famed as a performance venue for the great classics. Opera history was written here with numerous world premieres such as Richard Wagner’s Rienzi.

State Operetta

Dresden State Operetta has taken up residence at Kraftwerk Mitte, the former power station that generated electricity for the city. Great entertainment with classical operettas, fast-paced shows, musical comedies and operas.

1

Autumn walks

The most important sights in Dresden can be wonderfully explored on foot. Just take a few minutes more time and enjoy the colorful autumn atmosphere in the city on a walk. In the Großer Garten or the Alaunpark you are very close to the Golden October.

In the Elbland, the vines in the Elbland are colored in autumn in a wide variety of colors. Also here a short hike is worthwhile. As a reward, you can get one or two good drops of wine in the broom house or directly from the winegrower.

Tips for the autumn

Whether a walk through colorful forests, mushroom picking or a relaxing wellness day. Here are our autumn tips for you.

Autumn hikes

Between colorful vines through the romantic vineyards of Radebeul or on the King’s Trail around Moritzburg Castle – 10 hiking suggestions for the autumn

Opera, drama, concerts

Do you enjoy music and theatre? With more than 30 live performance venues, you are spoilt for choice. Foremost amongst them is the Semper Opera House with its magnificent repertoire of traditional and modern productions. Then there is the Dresden State Operetta in the new artistic and creative complex of Kraftwerk Mitte, offering a mix of well-known musicals and the finest operettas; it is the only stage in Germany devoted exclusively to the genre.

Theatre of the non-musical variety can be found at the Staatsschauspiel Dresden. Supplementing the familiar faces on the Dresden drama scene are guest appearances by well-known actors and actresses from other major German companies. The Dresden Philharmonic Orchestra normally performs in the large concert hall of the Kulturpalast, but during the 2020 summer season, they will give four open-air concerts in the context of the Film Nights on the Elbe Embankment festival.

Younger visitors to Dresden will enjoy the fairy tales and other entertaining stories told at the Dresden Puppentheater, while teenagers will appreciate the youth-focused programme of the Junge Generation theatre whose latest production is Das doppelte Lottchen. The Semperoper also organises behind-the-scenes tours for youngsters.

State Operetta

Dresden State Operetta has taken up residence at Kraftwerk Mitte, the former power station that generated electricity for the city. Great entertainment with classical operettas, fast-paced shows, musical comedies and operas.

Semper Opera House

Dresden boasts one of the most beautiful opera houses in the world, admired for its magnificent acoustics and famed as a performance venue for the great classics. Opera history was written here with numerous world premieres such as Richard Wagner’s Rienzi.

Attractions galore: Old Town and baroque

Zwinger, Royal Palace, Hofkirche: three amazing examples of baroque architecture that shape the face of the city. Also unmissable is the beautiful Altmarkt with the impressive Kreuzkirche. Incidentally, this older of the two main market places in the city is the site of the famous Striezelmarkt at Christmas time. Why not make a note of the dates in your diary now? And if you would like get a completely different perspective, the temporary Ferris wheel on Postplatz affords magnificent views of the Old Town, but hurry, because it will only be there until 23rd August.

Zwinger

One of the most famous baroque buildings in Germany, the Zwinger Palace houses a unique collection of treasures. The current exhibition in the Zwinger Xperience allows visitors to immerse themselves in the royal ‘Wedding of the Century’ that took place in 1719.

Royal Palace

Almost 800 years of history and some of Dresden’s most important museums are located in the Residenzschloss, including the world-famous Green Vault and the Numismatic Collection. The crowning glory, however, is the State Apartment, a suite of rooms that have been faithfully restored to their original condition.

Attractions galore: Old Town and baroque

Zwinger, Royal Palace, Hofkirche: three amazing examples of baroque architecture that shape the face of the city. Also unmissable is the beautiful Altmarkt with the impressive Kreuzkirche. Incidentally, this older of the two main market places in the city is the site of the famous Striezelmarkt at Christmas time. Why not make a note of the dates in your diary now? And if you would like get a completely different perspective, the temporary Ferris wheel on Postplatz affords magnificent views of the Old Town, but hurry, because it will only be there until 23rd August.

Zwinger

One of the most famous baroque buildings in Germany, the Zwinger Palace houses a unique collection of treasures. The current exhibition in the Zwinger Xperience allows visitors to immerse themselves in the royal ‘Wedding of the Century’ that took place in 1719.

Royal Palace

Almost 800 years of history and some of Dresden’s most important museums are located in the Residenzschloss, including the world-famous Green Vault and the Numismatic Collection. The crowning glory, however, is the State Apartment, a suite of rooms that have been faithfully restored to their original condition.

‘Organ Summer’ in the Kreuzkirche

If the weather should turn cool or wet, the Kreuzkirche (Church of the Holy Cross) has ample space for socially distanced concert enjoyment. During the International Organ Weeks and ‘Organ Summer’ (from 15th July to 29th August), there is a concert every Wednesday at 8pm and every Saturday at 3pm.

very good health! Outings to local vineyards

Sun-drenched walls, steep terraces and an almost Mediterranean climate: the vineyards in Dresden Elbland form the perfect contrast to the urban bustle of Dresden. Wine growing has influenced the character of the landscape and, thanks to more than 1,600 hours of sunshine a year, viticulture has been flourishing here for the past 850 years. Many estates and seasonal wine bars are opening their doors to the public for the first time in 2020. During the Summer of Open Wineries (Sommer der offenen Weingüter) from late June to the end of October 2020, you can raise your glass in the vineyard where the wine was grown.

The programme of events includes wine samplings, guided tours through vineyards and other tasty activities. There are some great wines and souvenirs to take home. To your

Outings to local vineyards

Guided tours of the great estates, wine tastings in the cellar or on the terrace, and mini concerts at the seasonal bars: here is a list of participating winemakers and the events they have planned.

Overnight stays on a wine estate

Bedrooms that overlook vineyards: Weingut Schloss Proschwitz and several other prominent estates offer overnight accommodation.

very good health! Outings to local vineyards

Sun-drenched walls, steep terraces and an almost Mediterranean climate: the vineyards in Dresden Elbland form the perfect contrast to the urban bustle of Dresden. Wine growing has influenced the character of the landscape and, thanks to more than 1,600 hours of sunshine a year, viticulture has been flourishing here for the past 850 years. Many estates and seasonal wine bars are opening their doors to the public for the first time in 2020. During the Summer of Open Wineries (Sommer der offenen Weingüter) from late June to the end of October 2020, you can raise your glass in the vineyard where the wine was grown.

The programme of events includes wine samplings, guided tours through vineyards and other tasty activities. There are some great wines and souvenirs to take home. To your

Outings to local vineyards

Guided tours of the great estates, wine tastings in the cellar or on the terrace, and mini concerts at the seasonal bars: here is a list of participating winemakers and the events they have planned.

Overnight stays on a wine estate

Bedrooms that overlook vineyards: Weingut Schloss Proschwitz and several other prominent estates offer overnight accommodation.

Traditional wine festivals

The traditional wine festivals of Meissen and Radebeul are held on the weekend of 25th – 27th September. Local winegrowers open their vineyards and seasonal bars to the public. Enjoy Saxon wines accompanied by culinary delicacies to the sound of music.

Divinely beautiful: In and around the Frauenkirche

Reopened in 2005 and restored as a permanent feature, the Frauenkirche has always been one of the city’s greatest landmarks. The Neumarkt with its numerous eating establishments fans out around the beautiful sandstone building. The menus of the restaurants on Neumarkt range from traditional Saxon cuisine to sushi, tapas and more. A beautiful area, framed by magnificent, reconstructed baroque facades.

How about a pleasant stroll along Münzgasse towards the Elbe? This will take you directly to Brühl’s Terrace, styled ‘the Balcony of Europe’. Inside and underneath the former battlements is one of the most modern museums in Europe: Festung Xperience features elaborate computer-generated imagery delivering multimedia insights into life in the 16th century. But if you prefer an analogue spectacular, just a hundred metres further on you will find the largest porcelain mural in the world. At 102 metres in length, the Procession of Princes (Fürstenzug) consisting of 25,000 tiles is a composite portrait of Saxon rulers through the centuries.

 

Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady)

There is so much to see inside the Frauenkirche, including its unique wall paintings. The view from the dome is also worth the climb. The dramatic history of the Frauenkirche is explained during a guided tour of the gallery beneath the dome.

Restaurants in and around Münzgasse

Cafés, beer garden, restaurants and cocktail bars: Münzgasse, the narrow street linking Brühl’s Terrace and the Frauenkirche, is popular with drinkers and diners.

Divinely beautiful: In and around the Frauenkirche

Reopened in 2005 and restored as a permanent feature, the Frauenkirche has always been one of the city’s greatest landmarks. The Neumarkt with its numerous eating establishments fans out around the beautiful sandstone building. The menus of the restaurants on Neumarkt range from traditional Saxon cuisine to sushi, tapas and more. A beautiful area, framed by magnificent, reconstructed baroque facades.

How about a pleasant stroll along Münzgasse towards the Elbe? This will take you directly to Brühl’s Terrace, styled ‘the Balcony of Europe’. Inside and underneath the former battlements is one of the most modern museums in Europe: Festung Xperience features elaborate computer-generated imagery delivering multimedia insights into life in the 16th century. But if you prefer an analogue spectacular, just a hundred metres further on you will find the largest porcelain mural in the world. At 102 metres in length, the Procession of Princes (Fürstenzug) consisting of 25,000 tiles is a composite portrait of Saxon rulers through the centuries.

Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady)

There is so much to see inside the Frauenkirche, including its unique wall paintings. The view from the dome is also worth the climb. The dramatic history of the Frauenkirche is explained during a guided tour of the gallery beneath the dome.

Restaurants in and around Münzgasse

Cafés, beer garden, restaurants and cocktail bars: Münzgasse, the narrow street linking Brühl’s Terrace and the Frauenkirche, is popular with drinkers and diners.

The district that never sleeps: Dresden Neustadt

Interested in discovering something different? A livelier part of town? The hip ‘alternative quarter’ of Neustadt on the right bank of the Elbe has it all: pub culture, boutique shopping, a youthful outlook and a casual, relaxed attitude to life. Largely built between German unification in 1871 and the First World War, this dynamic part of the city is brimming with optimism and ideas. Experience a colourful mix of old buildings, thought-provoking graffiti and street art on every corner: huge gable murals, artistic gems that are almost hidden way and statements. Dresden Neustadt is opinionated and expressive. Although it is constantly evolving, its essential character remains the same. The Neustadt scene is defined by the narrow and densely populated streets with their diversity of restaurants, small shops and cultural offerings, as well as the highest density of pubs. There are plenty of good reasons for a visit to Neustadt, and you can doubtless discover many more for yourself!

Kunsthofpassage

A must-see: the Kunsthofpassage. Immerse yourself in another world. An eccentric maze of backyards with mythical creatures, musical rain gutters and more. Bring your camera, as there are some memorable photo shots to be had between the small restaurants and craft shops.

Cheerful hostels

As hip and colourful as Neustadt itself are the accommodation options. Fancy a night in a Trabi? No problem at Hostel Lollis Homestay. You can sleep under the stars at Mondpalast (Moon Palace) or take one of the imaginatively individual rooms in the LaLeLu Hostel.

The district that never sleeps: Dresden Neustadt

Interested in discovering something different? A livelier part of town? The hip ‘alternative quarter’ of Neustadt on the right bank of the Elbe has it all: pub culture, boutique shopping, a youthful outlook and a casual, relaxed attitude to life. Largely built between German unification in 1871 and the First World War, this dynamic part of the city is brimming with optimism and ideas. Experience a colourful mix of old buildings, thought-provoking graffiti and street art on every corner: huge gable murals, artistic gems that are almost hidden way and statements. Dresden Neustadt is opinionated and expressive. Although it is constantly evolving, its essential character remains the same. The Neustadt scene is defined by the narrow and densely populated streets with their diversity of restaurants, small shops and cultural offerings, as well as the highest density of pubs. There are plenty of good reasons for a visit to Neustadt, and you can doubtless discover many more for yourself!

Kunsthofpassage

A must-see: the Kunsthofpassage. Immerse yourself in another world. An eccentric maze of backyards with mythical creatures, musical rain gutters and more. Bring your camera, as there are some memorable photo shots to be had between the small restaurants and craft shops.

Cheerful hostels

As hip and colourful as Neustadt itself are the accommodation options. Fancy a night in a Trabi? No problem at Hostel Lollis Homestay. You can sleep under the stars at Mondpalast (Moon Palace) or take one of the imaginatively individual rooms in the LaLeLu Hostel.

The perfect setting for jewels and art

In the possession of the Dresden State Art Collections are some truly world-class masterpieces, including Raphael’s celebrated Sistine Madonna which is on permanent display at the Zwinger in the Old Masters Picture Gallery (Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister). Across the road in the Royal Palace are treasures that literally sparkle: the diamonds in the Royal Treasury and the faithfully restored State Apartment compete for glory.

The historic Green Vault is also a veritable time machine. Returning to the Zwinger, the finest materials and triumphs of design are exhibited in the Porcelain Collection which includes the most beautiful and significant pieces from the personal collection of Augustus the Strong. And there is more to see at the Albertinum gallery which has historical collections as well as world-famous works of modern art.

There are numerous other museums offering fascinating insights and virtual journeys through time. With the Dresden Museums Card, you can spend two whole days exploring most of the city’s museums, galleries, parks, gardens and other places of culture at a low all-inclusive price.

Old Masters Picture Gallery

The Old Masters Picture Gallery has been returned to its previous address. The extensively renovated Semperbau at the Zwinger has been reconfigured so that its world-famous paintings are displayed alongside small bronzes and marble sculptures.

Grünes Gewölbe

The Royal Treasury is housed inside the authentically restored rooms of the Historic Green Vault on the ground floor of the Royal Palace. One floor above, the New Green Vault displays some very special individual items.

The perfect setting for jewels and art

In the possession of the Dresden State Art Collections are some truly world-class masterpieces, including Raphael’s celebrated Sistine Madonna which is on permanent display at the Zwinger in the Old Masters Picture Gallery (Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister). Across the road in the Royal Palace are treasures that literally sparkle: the diamonds in the Royal Treasury and the faithfully restored State Apartment compete for glory.

The historic Green Vault is also a veritable time machine. Returning to the Zwinger, the finest materials and triumphs of design are exhibited in the Porcelain Collection which includes the most beautiful and significant pieces from the personal collection of Augustus the Strong. And there is more to see at the Albertinum gallery which has historical collections as well as world-famous works of modern art.

There are numerous other museums offering fascinating insights and virtual journeys through time. With the Dresden Museums Card, you can spend two whole days exploring most of the city’s museums, galleries, parks, gardens and other places of culture at a low all-inclusive price.

Old Masters Picture Gallery

The Old Masters Picture Gallery has been returned to its previous address. The extensively renovated Semperbau at the Zwinger has been reconfigured so that its world-famous paintings are displayed alongside small bronzes and marble sculptures.

Grünes Gewölbe

The Royal Treasury is housed inside the authentically restored rooms of the Historic Green Vault on the ground floor of the Royal Palace. One floor above, the New Green Vault displays some very special individual items.

Take it easy: From Pirna to Meissen

The Elbe runs through Dresden Elbland like a blue ribbon. There is so much for visitors to discover along its entire length. Take a trip on one of the old Elbe paddle steamers or ride your bike along the Elbe Cycle Route. Explore the beauty of the region at your own pace, breaking off whenever you like for interesting finds along the way.

One photo opportunity we especially recommend is the Blue Wonder bridge (Blaues Wunder), an aesthetically impressive steel structure opened in 1893. And assuming you always have a smartphone or camera to hand, keep an eye out for castles and palaces on the slopes of the Elbe. Within the city bounds of Dresden alone, there are three magnificent stately homes, namely Albrechtsberg, Lingner and Eckberg perched alongside each other on the north bank of the Elbe.

Loschwitz and Blaues Wunder

The road ascends steeply from the Blaues Wunder bridge to the magnificent villa suburb of Loschwitz. The view from the top across the city is simply fantastic. . If you don’t feel up to a strenuous climb, you can ride in comfort on either the funicular or the suspension railway. Loschwitz village at the north end of the bridge is characterised by rustic half-timbered houses.

The Elbe Palaces

Not far from the Blaues Wunder bridge is a trio of palaces overlooking the Elbe. The grounds are laid out in the English style and are a positive invitation to take a stroll. The terraces are partly used for wine growing and offer an impressive view over the east of Dresden.

Take it easy: From Pirna to Meissen

The Elbe runs through Dresden Elbland like a blue ribbon. There is so much for visitors to discover along its entire length. Take a trip on one of the old Elbe paddle steamers or ride your bike along the Elbe Cycle Route. Explore the beauty of the region at your own pace, breaking off whenever you like for interesting finds along the way.

One photo opportunity we especially recommend is the Blue Wonder bridge (Blaues Wunder), an aesthetically impressive steel structure opened in 1893. And assuming you always have a smartphone or camera to hand, keep an eye out for castles and palaces on the slopes of the Elbe. Within the city bounds of Dresden alone, there are three magnificent stately homes, namely Albrechtsberg, Lingner and Eckberg perched alongside each other on the north bank of the Elbe.

Loschwitz and Blaues Wunder

The road ascends steeply from the Blaues Wunder bridge to the magnificent villa suburb of Loschwitz. The view from the top across the city is simply fantastic. . If you don’t feel up to a strenuous climb, you can ride in comfort on either the funicular or the suspension railway. Loschwitz village at the north end of the bridge is characterised by rustic half-timbered houses.

The Elbe Palaces

Not far from the Blaues Wunder bridge is a trio of palaces overlooking the Elbe. The grounds are laid out in the English style and are a positive invitation to take a stroll. The terraces are partly used for wine growing and offer an impressive view over the east of Dresden.

The contrasting architecture of Dresden Elbland

A mixture of baroque, modern and unclassifiable styles, the range of architectural masterpieces to be discovered is extreme. One of the most outstanding examples of contemporary design is the New Synagogue (Neue Synagoge), the first new place of Jewish worship to be built in the former East Germany. It replaces the Alte Synagoge of Gottfried Semper, which was destroyed during the November pogroms of 1938. The functional cuboid shape is intended to remind us of early temples. The Yenidze presents quite a contrast – this former cigarette factory dating back to the 1920s was built to resemble a mosque. Then there is the Russian Orthodox Church to a design based on 17th-century churches in Moscow; its parishioners have included those two luminaries of Russian literature and music, Dostoevsky and Rachmaninov. Also worth seeing are Daniel Libeskind’s Military History Museum and the Volkswagen Transparent Factory (Gläserne Manufaktur); you can stand outside and see vehicle production taking place.

Militärhistorisches Museum

The Museum of Military History is one of the largest of its kind in Europe. The modern extension designed by architect Daniel Libeskind is a special attraction: the historical building appears to have been split asunder by a gigantic steel arrowhead. This functions as a viewing platform with information panels on the air raid of 1945.

Yenidze

At first sight, the Yenidze looks like a mosque. The imaginative oriental style is complemented by the coloured glass dome and a factory chimney disguised as a minaret. This oriental-looking building originally housed a cigarette factory but is now an office complex.

The contrasting architecture of Dresden Elbland

A mixture of baroque, modern and unclassifiable styles, the range of architectural masterpieces to be discovered is extreme. One of the most outstanding examples of contemporary design is the New Synagogue (Neue Synagoge), the first new place of Jewish worship to be built in the former East Germany. It replaces the Alte Synagoge of Gottfried Semper, which was destroyed during the November pogroms of 1938. The functional cuboid shape is intended to remind us of early temples. The Yenidze presents quite a contrast – this former cigarette factory dating back to the 1920s was built to resemble a mosque. Then there is the Russian Orthodox Church to a design based on 17th-century churches in Moscow; its parishioners have included those two luminaries of Russian literature and music, Dostoevsky and Rachmaninov. Also worth seeing are Daniel Libeskind’s Military History Museum and the Volkswagen Transparent Factory (Gläserne Manufaktur); you can stand outside and see vehicle production taking place.

The Museum of Military History

The Museum of Military History is one of the largest of its kind in Europe. The modern extension designed by architect Daniel Libeskind is a special attraction: the historical building appears to have been split asunder by a gigantic steel arrowhead. This functions as a viewing platform with information panels on the air raid of 1945.

Yenidze

At first sight, the Yenidze looks like a mosque. The imaginative oriental style is complemented by the coloured glass dome and a factory chimney disguised as a minaret. This oriental-looking building originally housed a cigarette factory but is now an office complex.